Magnificent Grand Canyon (and workers in 110-degree heat)

ImageTalk about Wonders of the World!

(But first, WordPress reminded today that it was my two-year anniversary of blogging with them. So, a BIG thank-you to them, and to YOU all.)

My wife Mukti and I just came back from a trip to Grand Canyon and Las Vegas. Las Vegas was forgettable, even though we went there for a special labor conference and that was great.

But Grand Canyon was simply incredible. It was a breathtaking experience.

Millions of people have visited the gorgeous gorge, the canyon over river Colorado, and its many deep trails and steep cliffs and rough terrains and coniferous landscape and Angel’s Window and Vishnu Temple. Millions have wrote about them and posted photos. Ours won’t be a big difference.

Still, I can’t resist temptations to show you some of the photos we took from the places we visited. I want to share these memorable moments with you. I hope you read the short descriptions I’m posting along with the photos.

I’m sure you’ll find a little bit of difference in my way to describe this memorable trip.

Especially, I want to show you how workers toil away in the 110-plus heat day after day, to keep the tourism machine running. No essay can be complete without including them in it.

Let me know what you think.

We drove 900 miles — from Nevada to Utah to Arizona to Utah and then back to Nevada. Then we took a long flight back across the U.S.

Just happy to be back in New York.

Sincerely Sharing,

Partha

Brooklyn

Cape Royal Vishnu Temple range. Can you locate the flowing Colorado River down there? You may need to zoom it in. Try and let me know. We had a hard time first to find it. It's way over...and down...there.
Cape Royal Vishnu Temple range. Can you locate the flowing Colorado River down there? You may need to zoom it in. Try and let me know. We had a hard time to find it. It’s way over…and down…there.
The famous Angel's Window is on the rocks of Cape Royal, an isolated place off North Rim. Look closely at the people on the very top, near the ledge. We were there too. It's mind blowing how Nature has kept this window in place, in snow or storm, for centuries, millenniums. Unbelievable, if you think of it.
The famous Angel’s Window is on the rocks of Cape Royal, an isolated place off North Rim. Look closely at the people on the very top, near the ledge. We were there too. It’s mind blowing how Nature has kept this window in place, in snow or storm, for centuries, millenniums. Unbelievable, if you think of it.
Grand Canyon in silhouette. Mother Nature plays fun game...in simple pleasure. Life passes in front of it.
Grand Canyon in silhouette. Mother Nature plays fun game…in simple pleasure. Life passes in front of it.
This woman is guarding the new road construction near Marble Rock Canyon. She is in 110 degrees heat all day long, and her only shade is the stop sign. She calls pilot cars for tourists like us who want to go deep inside to see Lee's Ferry where whitewater rafters sail their boats on Colorado River. In July, temperature here could reach 125 degrees Fahrenheit.
This woman is guarding the new road construction near Marble Rock Canyon. She is in 110-degree heat all day long, and her only shade is the stop sign. She calls in pilot cars for tourists like us who want to go deep inside to see Lee’s Ferry where whitewater rafters sail their boats on Colorado River. In July, temperature here could reach 125 degrees Fahrenheit.
Lee's Ferry, base of Colorado River. This is where whitewater rafters sail on their boats along the hundreds of miles of dangerous but fun waters. The background is called Vermillion Cliffs and it's simply breathtaking. The natural carvings on the stone resemble giant figures...as if gods and goddesses are watching over us.
Lee’s Ferry, base of Colorado River. This is where whitewater rafters sail on their boats along the hundreds of miles of dangerous but fun waters. The background is called Vermillion Cliffs and it’s simply breathtaking. The natural carvings on the stone resemble giant figures…as if gods and goddesses are watching over us.
The massive Navajo Bridge over river Colorado. Another reminder what workers have done for us. Simply wonderful.
The massive Navajo Bridge over river Colorado. Another reminder what workers have done for us. Simply wonderful. (And let’s not talk about how the kings and colonists and Columbuses robbed and raped and killed and crushed the Navajos and Siouxes all the other “Indian” tribes…to build this modern Roman Empire called USA.)
North Rim. Our First View of the Canyon.
North Rim. Our First View of the Canyon.

14 thoughts on “Magnificent Grand Canyon (and workers in 110-degree heat)

  1. Awe inspiring both from the perspective of natural beauty and the human commitment to maintain access to such a site. Thank you for reminding us that we are stewards of such grandeur and hats off to those who toil in that service.

    1. Thank you, Nina for writing. I’ve been teaching labor economics with an emphasis on human rights. We need to talk more about the contribution of the worker here in the U.S. and around the world. Do keep in touch and write more.

  2. Enjoyed the pics and ur description and thought of the workers who toil to make tourists go Ahhhh!! since Goa is a tourist destination I salute all the labour from mostly other states who rake in the money for the state but are treated and called ‘outsiders’- what a way the world takes its pleasures!!!

    1. Thanks, Anita for your valuable insight. This is a global phenomenon: worker exploitation in the name of democracy, freedom and prosperity. Write more and send us more examples.

  3. Hi Partha,

    I grew up in Las Vegas! I also worked for one of the river rafting companies when I lived in Flagstaff, AZ. I was blessed to be able to go down the river on one of the rafts during my training for my office job at the company. It was a once-in-a-lifetime experience, that I feel SO blessed to have been able to do. I will never forget how awe-inspiring it was!!!

    1. Neva, I also would much like to know what it was like growing up in Las Vegas. Write if you can. How was it then and how has it changed now. Where do the ordinary folks live there. What do they do for a living. Who built these giant casinos and hotels and what was the reaction of the ordinary people when they did it. What do children do there when they grow up. How do they see their future. Everything. It would be so great to know. Thanks. -Partha

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